This letter from Colleen Nisewonger, Jack Kirkpatrick’s daughter, contains an interesting bit of information—that families of imprisoned servicemen were allowed to send their loved one a single package of supplies and two packages containing cigarettes (or perhaps other tobacco products) every two months.

Unfortunately, I do not have the detailed instruction sheets and circular that were enclosed in this letter, but the letter itself is valuable evidence that each family was able to send supplies to their serviceman in captivity.

Here is the text of the letter:

WAR DEPARTMENT
ARMY SERVICE FORCES
OFFICE OF THE PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL
WASHINGTON

16 July 1943

Re: Sgt. John F. Kirkpatrick, Jr.

Mrs. Ann Kirkpatrick,
322 Lincoln Street,
Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

Dear Mrs. Kirkpatrick:

The Provost Marshal General directs me to inform you that the above-named prisoner of war has been reported transferred to Concentration Camp 59, Military Post 3300, Italy.

You may communicate with him by following the enclosed mailing instructions.

One package label and two tobacco labels are issued every sixty-day period to the next of kin without application. These are enclosed with instructions for their use.

Further information will be forwarded as soon as it is received.

Sincerely yours,

Howard F. Bresee,
Colonel, C.M.P.,
Chief, Information Branch.

Incls:
Labels
Package Instructions
Tobacco Instructions
Mailing Circular

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